Neuro-Optometric Rehabilitation Association

Enhancing Neurological Recovery Through Vision Rehabilitation

Blog

The Neuro-Optometric Rehabilitation Association is pleased to announce the launch of a new blog series in conjunction with Primary Care Optometry News. This blog series is primarily devoted to eye care professionals and other health care professionals who provide rehabilitative services to individuals who have suffered a traumatic brain injury, but is open to all readers. To view the NORA Blog archive, click here. Your comments, feedback and suggestions for future topics are welcomed. Email us at info@noravisionrehab.com

The Visual Effects of a Stroke are Significant—but Often Go Undetected

The Visual Effects of a Stroke are Significant—but Often Go Undetected

Every year, nearly 800,000 Americans suffer a stroke. Strokes are a leading cause of death and disability, but what many people don’t realize is that 2 out of 3 stroke survivors will also experience visual impairments related to their stroke. These can include diminished central or peripheral vision, eye movement abnormalities, or visual perceptual defects.

Improving This Visual Skill Could Help Prevent Sports Injuries

Improving This Visual Skill Could Help Prevent Sports Injuries

Female soccer players sustain more concussions than male or female athletes in any other high school sport, including football. Research suggests this may be due in part to perceptual narrowing and another automatic response to perceived risk, the startle reflex. The good news is that training soccer players to suppress the startle reflex and improve awareness of peripheral vision can reduce their chance of concussion.

Here’s Why a Once-Controversial Term - Minimal Brain Dysfunction – is Making a Comeback

Here’s Why a Once-Controversial Term - Minimal Brain Dysfunction – is Making a Comeback

In the 1960s and 70s, the term “minimal brain dysfunction” (MBD) was coined by psychiatrist Richard Gardner to describe children of normal intelligence who nevertheless exhibited some deficits in learning, visual processing, memory, etc. The term MBD eventually fell out of favor; it was viewed as too negative a label and too nonspecific. However, Gardner may have been on to something.